What Pets Can and Cant Eat

November 20, 2015

Pets enjoy healthy snacks, too — even fruits and veggies.

Pet parents often think snacks that are packaged for pets will be the best treats in the world, but a lot of those packaged pet snacks are mostly devoid of nutritional value. We encourage kids to eat their veggies rather than eat unhealthily, but we need to encourage a love for veggies in our pets, too! These low calorie, low fat, vitamin and mineral packed “treats” are a great alternative to the packaged dog biscuits and kitty chews.

If you are unsure, check with your veterinarian to make sure that your planned treats are not going to be harmful to your pet. Keep in mind that while dogs are omnivores, therefore more open to trying different kinds of foods and cats, on the other hand are carnivores which make them incapable of digesting some types of foods.

Here’s a list of healthy treats for PETS that may go over well with your pets, followed by a list of foods you will need to avoid.

Safe Foods:

    • Apples – without seeds or core (seeds contain chemical compounds that are poisonous to animals)
    • Blueberries
    • Strawberries
    • Watermelon (without seeds)
    • Cantaloupe
  • Frozen bananas
  • Green beans, squash, zucchini
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Popcorn (unsalted and unbuttered)
  • Catnip or cat grass
  • Carrots (raw or cooked)
  • Sweet potato (cooked, cubed or mashed without butter or seasoning); regular potatoes are also good, but in limited amounts since they are high in sugar and can increase weight
  • Pumpkin (good for the urinary tract, digestion, skin and coat) give in small amounts only because pumpkin can cause constipation

Unsafe Foods:

  • Grapes, raisins (contain chemical compounds that are toxic to dogs)
  • Garlic, onions (both have chemical properties that can be toxic and life-threatening to dogs and cats)
  • Green Tomatoes
  • Avocado
  • Mushrooms (wild mushrooms)
  • Fruits with pits (peaches, cherries and plums); pits can be toxic or choking hazard
  • Nuts (macadamia nuts, in particular, are toxic)
  • Peanut Butter (some brands contain xylitol – an artificial sweetener that is very toxic and life threatening to dogs…READ LABELS!!!)

These foods should be baked or steamed, cut up into small-ish pieces and given in small amounts at a time. You can also mash, puree or mix them up with prepared pet food given at meal times.

Replacing your pets packaged treats with healthy treats like fruits and vegetables will be one of the most beneficial things you can do for your pet. It’s important to observe your pet for issues that can arise in response to the change. If your pet starts to show any digestive or behavioral changes, stop feeding the new foods and consult with a veterinarian.

More on pet nutrition:

2 thoughts on “What Pets Can and Cant Eat”

  1. Occasionally I’ve given my Beagle hard-boiled egg whites with his dinner, and so far I’ve never noticed any abnormal reactions to having them. He seems to like them a lot.

    Recently I have read this post, and it helps me understand that it’s not a bad thing to keep giving eggs to him. But everything in moderation!

    http://peanutpaws.com/can-dogs-eat-eggs/

    Thanks for this helpful article.

  2. I have read this post, and it helps me. But everything in moderation. but we need to encourage a love for veggies in our pets, too! These low calorie, low fat, vitamin, and mineral packed “treats” are a great alternative to the packaged dog biscuits and kitty chews. Thanks for share